Where do you start, and where do you stop, when talking about Jeffreys Bay, universally known as one of, if not, the best waves in the world? This wave (or in fact series of interlinking waves) has everything any surfer could ever need, with the possible exception of warm water. A tantalising mix of sand and reef, tubes and open face, consistency, length, variety and quality means that it easily falls into that cliche of a wave that every surfer must surf before they die. To not do so is to do you, your country and every other surfer in the world, a huge disservice. Ask yourself this; do you really want to die unhappy, dispirited and forlorn, knowing you had the chance the surf one of the world’s geographic surfing diamonds, and didn’t?

If the conditions are right, that is a six to eight foot swell is being airbrushed by a light sou-west wind (which through the months of May to September happens with ridiculous regularity) Supertubes throws up some of the most perfect, powerful and paciest tubes on the planet. And if you time it right paddling through the key hole (a big if granted) you can even be in the line-up with dry hair. Six wave sets roll in, each wave a mirror images of the last, with six second tubes the norm. It’s also a known scientific fact that you will never travel as fast on a surfboard as you will if you manage to catch a six foot waves at Supers.

In addition, if the action at Supertubes is too intense, there are plenty of other sections offering world class waves and a mellower vibe. After Supertubes, comes Impossibles (named with good reason), before sections known as Tubes, Point and the Albatross, which all offer set takeoff zones, less crowds and long wally fun waves. Of course if all the planets align and you have Dalai Llama like Karma, it’s possible to ride a wave from Supertubes all the way through to the Point, by which time you’ll have legs like jelly, a heart beating like a hummingbird’s, a 800 yard paddle back out and a sense that no matter what happen in the rest of your life, you can die happy.

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